Rick Steves' European Christmas: Germany



More info about travel to Germany: When it comes to traditional holiday images, Germany’s Bavaria is the heartland. Here we’ll savor classic holiday themes: glittering trees, old-time carols, and colorful Christmas markets.

At you’ll find money-saving travel tips, small-group tours, guidebooks, TV shows, radio programs, podcasts, and more on this destination.

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48 thoughts on “Rick Steves' European Christmas: Germany

  • September 28, 2020 at 8:21 am
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    giftgiver in germany: instead of an saint it's the jesus when he's an baby and was represented an golden angel.

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  • September 28, 2020 at 8:21 am
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    I'm a Nuremberg native and so proud to see we get to represent German Christmas. ❤

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  • September 28, 2020 at 8:21 am
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    Love it…Christmas is Fantastic in Europeans countrys…God bless from America….I loves Christmas my favorite…🎖🎖🎖🎖🎖🏆🏆🏆🏆🎈🎈🎈🎈🎈🎈👏🏽👏🏽👏🏽

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  • September 28, 2020 at 8:21 am
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    Nice Video, but too bad that you didnt cover the German Erzgebirge which also has a big impact on the german Christmas. Its definetly worth a visit and has great traditions.

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  • September 28, 2020 at 8:21 am
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    I have studied world history deeply mark my word GERMANY IS NO.1ON LIST….

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  • September 28, 2020 at 8:21 am
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    The reality of Germany. The land of pogroms, massacres, and mass graves with blood-soaked soil.

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  • September 28, 2020 at 8:21 am
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    .. im a Catholic seeing this video is a sign of Peace for all and Love 💕 after all "Jesus" our lord and savior. . again from a Catholic Blessings Love and Peace with all the saints and of Gods angels ..Have a merry Christmas 🙏💕 and Peace be with you 😊💌

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  • September 28, 2020 at 8:21 am
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    Such a wonderful culture. I want to experience German Christmas. It would be such an amazing experience.

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  • September 28, 2020 at 8:21 am
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    Not cool Rick. You do the whole show in English, but then want to give us the German spelling of Nuremburg at the start -I was looking for this city called Nurnberg – doesn't exist on an English map. If you're in Vienna doing an English show would you start off saying welcome to Wien? You had me scratching my head for quite sometime trying to find Nurnberg – especially without umlauts….nice touch.

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  • September 28, 2020 at 8:21 am
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    “Martin Luther the great reformer” HAHA! I threw up a little in my mouth.

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  • September 28, 2020 at 8:21 am
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    C'mon, Rick! There is no ginger in Lebkuchen! The name is used because most LK has the dark brown color associated with gingerbread. Or darker! That's worse by far than calling people from the Netherlands "Dutch" a corruption of Deutsch.

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  • September 28, 2020 at 8:21 am
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    My students are doing a Christmas around the World play (student written) and Germany is one of the countries they decided to include. This video is great for me to show! Thank you!!

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  • September 28, 2020 at 8:21 am
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    Going to Germany for Christmas to Bavaria and in particular Munich, Nurenberg and Rothenburg. Watching your video, I cant wait for Christmas now

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  • September 28, 2020 at 8:21 am
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    Can't find the "European Christmas" DVD at the PBS Store.

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  • September 28, 2020 at 8:21 am
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    Thank you so much for sharing this with us Rick. It wasn't until seeing this series did I ever think I would like to visit Germany even though my heritage is German. I love all your travels, keep up the wonderful work.

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  • September 28, 2020 at 8:21 am
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    Who goes to a Christmas market for filming during the day?? It’s meant to be seen at night!

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  • September 28, 2020 at 8:21 am
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    Rick has done so much for European travel I'll forgive his largely incorrect narrative.  The wood figures come from Saxony, not Bayern, Nuernberg lebkuchen is not Gingerbread!  Sorry, but ginger doesn't enter in-it's premium ingredients are honey and almonds.  fwiw-I collect Lebkuchen containers in wood, tin, pewter and glass going back over 100 years.  Tyrolian gunners above Regensburg?  They aren't local-the Tyrol is on the Austrian/Italian border.  I did enjoy one year when Steve went to Europe for Christmas and it got too warm and there was almost no snow but one of eight cities had some for the show.  I was there that year and what snow you got melted off the roofs in the afternoon and left the streets slippery.  Keep it up, Steve!

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  • September 28, 2020 at 8:21 am
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    Christmas in Germany is so beautiful ^^ It's little wonder that many Christmas traditions are borrowed from Germany's traditions of Christmas ,a celebration in a land like no other, beautiful ^^

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  • September 28, 2020 at 8:21 am
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    ~ 2:15: The majority in germany, especially in the south and west, is catholic, not protestant. And the catholism is a much bigger thing in german society and politics than the protestanism.

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  • September 28, 2020 at 8:21 am
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    I love the Christmas markets. I will try to go back every year…

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  • September 28, 2020 at 8:21 am
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    You should have gone to Dresden, Saxony to the oldest Christmas market of Germany. Also many german christmas traditions are from that region. Bavaria is not the heart of German Christmas, it's Saxony!

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  • September 28, 2020 at 8:21 am
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    im from bavaria and the christkind comes on the 24 at the evening after dinner not on the 25th

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  • September 28, 2020 at 8:21 am
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    Many of the world's and especially Germany's Christmas traditions, like Christmas trees, these wooden figures, etc. come from the Ore Mountains region in Saxony.

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  • September 28, 2020 at 8:21 am
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    nope, mozart was born in salzburg(1765), and that time salzburg was still a part of germany.

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  • September 28, 2020 at 8:21 am
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    It's the same as the US really. Just more old skool shiz going down. If you ever need a place to stay in Germany, you're welcome at my place . Bring some beef jerky and I'll even let you drive my Mercedes over the Autobahn at tree-fiddy.

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  • September 28, 2020 at 8:21 am
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    German is the best language to sing in. I need to learn how to sing.

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  • September 28, 2020 at 8:21 am
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    I really enjoyed this Rick and actually tasted my 1st Nuremberg sausage the other day! Check out my video all about German food at Leeds' Christmas Market in the UK!

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  • September 28, 2020 at 8:21 am
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    That sux. How can I ever find this exact version of that song then?. If anyone comes up with anything, please post.. I love that song!!.

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  • September 28, 2020 at 8:21 am
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    Ich liebe Weihnachten in Deutschland! Sehr anders als andere Laendern und ich werde in Deutschland zu Weihnachten in diesem Jahr :>

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  • September 28, 2020 at 8:21 am
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    Its real name is "Es ist für uns eine Zeit angekommen". Although there are many different text-versions, all have the first line of the first verse in common and that is "Es ist für uns eine Zeit angekommen". So it is named after its first line. The video just doesnt show the first verse, it starts with the 3rd or 4th verse, that's why you don't hear the title line.

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