34 thoughts on “GreekOrthodoxChurch Live Stream

  • August 15, 2020 at 7:52 am
    Permalink

    Vatican Seeks to Eliminate Use of the Divine Name

    THE Catholic hierarchy is seeking to eliminate the use of the divine name in their church services. Last year, the Vatican Congregation for Divine Worship and the Discipline of the Sacraments sent instructions on this matter to Catholic bishops’ conferences worldwide. The step was taken “by directive” of the pope.

    This document, dated June 29, 2008, decries the fact that despite instructions to the contrary, “in recent years the practice has crept in of pronouncing the God of Israel’s proper name, known as the holy or divine tetragrammaton, written with four consonants of the Hebrew alphabet in the form יהוה, YHWH.” The document notes that the divine name has variously been rendered “Yahweh,” “Yahwè,” “Jahweh,” “Jahwè,” “Jave,” “Yehovah,” and so forth. However, the Vatican directive seeks to reestablish the traditional Catholic position. That is to say, the Tetragrammaton is to be replaced by “Lord.” Moreover, in Catholic religious services, hymns, and prayers, God’s name “YHWH is neither to be used or pronounced.”

    In support of this position, the Vatican’s document appeals to the “immemorial tradition” of Catholicism. The directive claims that even in the Septuagint translation of the Hebrew Scriptures, dating to pre-Christian times, the divine name was regularly rendered Ky′ri·os, the Greek word for “Lord.” Thus, the directive insists, “Christians, too, from the beginning never pronounced the divine tetragrammaton.” This statement, however, ignores clear evidence to the contrary. Early copies of the Septuagint contained, not Ky′ri·os, but the divine name in the form יהוה. Christ’s first-century followers knew and pronounced God’s name. Jesus himself said in prayer to his Father: “I have made your name known.” (John 17:26) And in his well-known model prayer, Jesus taught us to pray: “Our Father in the heavens, let your name be sanctified.”—Matthew 6:9.

    Reply
  • August 15, 2020 at 7:52 am
    Permalink

    What did the apostle mean by calling Jesus Christ “the first-born of all creation”? Paul’s further words enlarge on the matter: “He is the head of the body, the church; he is the beginning, the first-born from the dead, that in everything he might be pre-eminent.”—Col. 1:18, CB.

    Here we find that the Greek words for both “first-born” (protótokos) and “beginning” (arkhé) describe Jesus as the first one of a group of class, “the body, the church,” and therefore he has preeminence in this respect. He also has preeminence in being the first one resurrected to endless life from among all the human dead.—1 Cor. 15:22, 23.

    The same Greek words occur in the Greek Septuagint translation at Genesis 49:3: “Ruben, thou art my first-born [protótokos], thou my strength, and the first [arkhé, “beginning”] of my children.” (Compare Deuteronomy 21:17, Septuagint.) From such Biblical statements it is reasonable to conclude that the Son of God is the firstborn of all creation in the sense of being the first of God’s creatures. In fact, Jesus refers to himself as “the beginning [arkhé] of God’s creation.” (Rev. 3:14, CB) The New World Translation renders the phrase in this verse: “the beginning of the creation by God.”

    There are many who object to the idea of Jesus as being a created person. They argue that since “in him all things were created” (CB)—during his prehuman existence in heaven—Jesus himself could not be a creature. Such individuals believe that Jesus is himself Almighty God, the second person of a “trinity” of three coequal, coeternal persons in one “godhead.”

    Individuals of that persuasion interpret the Greek expression (at Revelation 3:14) for “the beginning of God’s creation” as meaning “the origin (or ‘primary source’) of the creation of God.” One who prefers this idea is the noted Greek scholar Henry Alford. Nevertheless, in his work The Greek Testament, Alford concedes: “The mere word arkhé would admit the meaning that Christ is the first created being: see Gen. xlix. 3; Deut. xxi. 17; and Prov. viii. 22. And so the Arians here take it, and some who have followed them: e.g. Castalio, ‘chef d’œuvre:’ ‘omnium Dei operum excellentissimum atque primum:’ [meaning “the first and most excellent of all God’s works”] and so Ewald and Züllig.”

    “Jehovah our God is one Jehovah.” (Deut. 6:4) Search if you will, there is no statement in either the Hebrew or the Christian Greek Scriptures that God consists of three persons and that he shares his eternalness and omnipotence with two others. Even as the New Catholic Encyclopedia admits: “The doctrine of the Holy Trinity is not taught in the O[ld] T[estament]. . . . The mystery of the Holy Trinity was not revealed to the Chosen People of the OT.” “One should not speak of Trinitarianism in the New Testament without serious qualification.” In fact, this authority dates the dogma of “one God in three Persons” to the last quarter of the fourth century. “Among the Apostolic Fathers, there has been nothing even remotely approaching such a mentality or perspective.”—Vol. XIV, pp. 306, 295, 299.

    Furthermore, in your search in the Scriptures you will find that Jesus, far from claiming equality with his Father, Jehovah God, stated: “The Father is greater than I am.” Far from his being coeternal with his Father, we read that Jesus is “the firstborn of all creation,” and “the beginning of the creation by God.” Some argue that “firstborn” here merely means that Jesus is the chief one and not that he was actually born. But still, if he is the first or chief of creation, then he was created and he did have a beginning! Surely simple logic tells us that the Father and Creator is older than the Son and the creation, does it not? And far from Jesus Christ’s being almighty, when on earth he prayed to his Father for help.—John 14:28; Col. 1:15; Rev. 3:14; Heb. 5:7, 8.

    Now consider another aspect of the God you worship. No doubt you believe that God is good. But does your church subscribe to the teaching that God punishes the wicked in an eternal torment of hellfire? As Billy Graham, currently America’s most popular evangelist, once put it: “The teaching of a literal hell is found in the creeds of all the leading churches. . . . God considered hell real enough that He sent his only Son to the world to save men from hell.” Regarding such doctrine, he also said, “I grant that it is the hardest of all the teachings of Christianity to receive.”

    The current Roman Catholic view of hell is set out in the New Catholic Encyclopedia (1967, Vol. 6, p. 1005): “It is impossible to soften the severity of Jesus’ warning against unrepented sin, and the sentimentalism that seeks to do so is a distortion of His teaching and that of the N[ew] T[estament] as a whole. The chief characteristic of hell as depicted in the NT is its fire that is unquenchable . . . and everlasting. . . . Whatever may be implied by the terms ‘unquenchable fire’ and ‘everlasting fire,’ they should not be explained away as meaningless.”

    Reply
  • August 15, 2020 at 7:52 am
    Permalink

    AS FOR JOHN 1:1 These translations use such words as “a god,” “divine” or “godlike” because the Greek word θεός (the•os′) is a singular predicate noun occurring before the verb and is not preceded by the definite article. This is an anarthrous the•os′. The God with whom the Word, or Logos, was originally is designated here by the Greek expression ὁ θεός, that is, the•os′ preceded by the definite article ho. This is an articular the•os′. Careful translators recognize that the articular construction of the noun points to an identity, a personality, whereas a singular anarthrous predicate noun preceding the verb points to a quality about someone. Therefore, John’s statement that the Word or Logos was “a god” or “divine” or “godlike” does not mean that he was the God with whom he was. It merely expresses a certain quality about the Word, or Logos, but it does not identify him as one and the same as God himself.

    In the Greek text there are many cases of a singular anarthrous predicate noun preceding the verb, such as in Mr 6:49; 11:32; Joh 4:19; 6:70; 8:44; 9:17; 10:1, 13, 33; 12:6. In these places translators insert the indefinite article “a” before the predicate noun in order to bring out the quality or characteristic of the subject. Since the indefinite article is inserted before the predicate noun in such texts, with equal justification the indefinite article “a” is inserted before the anarthrous θεός in the predicate of John 1:1 to make it read “a god.” The Sacred Scriptures confirm the correctness of this rendering.

    In his article “Qualitative Anarthrous Predicate Nouns: Mark 15:39 and John 1:1,” published in Journal of Biblical Literature, Vol. 92, Philadelphia, 1973, p. 85, Philip B. Harner said that such clauses as the one in Joh 1:1, “with an anarthrous predicate preceding the verb, are primarily qualitative in meaning. They indicate that the logos has the nature of theos. There is no basis for regarding the predicate theos as definite.” On p. 87 of his article, Harner concluded: “In John 1:1 I think that the qualitative force of the predicate is so prominent that the noun cannot be regarded as definite.”

    Reply
  • August 15, 2020 at 7:52 am
    Permalink

    Do you ever imagine how much money that they can get FROM YOU for doing shitty FAKE Cult/Pagan like that??
    Church is an Old and Legendary Scam.
    😂😂😂

    Reply
  • August 15, 2020 at 7:52 am
    Permalink

    I wonder if the church will prioritized truth after all these years of silencing those who dare to speak out.

    Reply
  • August 15, 2020 at 7:52 am
    Permalink

    The Greek gods and churches and Disney cheats on me😭😭😭😭I need a preyer

    Reply
  • August 15, 2020 at 7:52 am
    Permalink

    I’m Catholic and I find the Orthodox Divine Liturgy to be beautiful.

    Reply
  • August 15, 2020 at 7:52 am
    Permalink

    Hark. The Old Testament Invites Each Man & Woman to invite God to Stand With Us as The Captain of our Spiritual Journey. Christ brings us the Good News of Salvation Thru. Resurrection. We are All in Life's Playing Fields. Every
    Conscious Minute is an Opportunity to Use the Gift of Life in a Way That Demonstrates our Choices as God Ordained. We can Take Holy Communion as taking the Actions towards others and ourselves Guided by the Philanthropy defined in the New Testament. The richness and wealth of Eastern Orthodox Christian. Mission has nothing to do with financial ability. We are Blessed and given a huge inheritance of Spiritual Currency at Baptism.
    Prayer is encouraged yet the basics necessary to define Love/Agape are well Defined in the Parable of the Good Samaritan.
    All Christians need to find a way to Jerusalem to give real meaning to there lives.
    P.H. Dragonas, M D.
    Boston & NYC.

    Reply
  • August 15, 2020 at 7:52 am
    Permalink

    Let us back into the Holy Services 1000 are dying and you are not administering Holy Communion to the Faithful who need the Holy Mysteries to STAY WELL GET WELL and STOP THIS PLAGUE A CURSE YOU BRING ON YOUR HEADS and the HEADS of Millions Because you allow the Faithful to face death or even die without Holy Mysteries HERETICS VIPERS SNAKES! Church of Lord not exclusive club you deny the Faithful entrance you will be denied into God's Kingdom Where is your FAITH! Millions must live their faith this is Great Lent and attend Church look at the Holy Saint of Crete who communed LEPERS!!

    Reply
  • August 15, 2020 at 7:52 am
    Permalink

    Αυτός ο ελπιδοφορος δεν είναι που φιλάει το χέρι του Πάπα; Μέχρι και παράσιτα το μικρόφωνο κάνει. Η Αγία τριάδα να μας σώσει και μια μέρα ο αρχάγγελος Μιχαήλ να αρχίσει το ξεκαθάρισμα , ξέρετε εσείς οικουμενιστες….

    Reply
  • August 15, 2020 at 7:52 am
    Permalink

    ΑΞΙΟΣ to Father George. May CHRIST our Savior whose flock you now serve make your path smooth and fruitfull! GOD bless and protect you and yours always.

    Reply
  • August 15, 2020 at 7:52 am
    Permalink

    The quality of the microphones was not good. Too much static and scratching! Nevertheless, at least we are able to follow the Service. Here in Greece the GOvernment has closed the churches for services.

    Reply
  • August 15, 2020 at 7:52 am
    Permalink

    For some 50 years, the Greek Orthodox Archdiocese of America has employed the practice of "Flexible Bilingualism," largely, in celebration of the Divine Services largely throughout the parishes. I would have loved to listen and watch this Orthros service, but I regret I have to turn it off because there is no English. If that's the practice in this beautiful parish, so be it. But, I ask that particularly during this crisis for services that will be videoed for publication on YouTube, His Eminence should visit parishes that employ bi-lingual execution of the Divine Services. These chanters have been gifted with beautiful voices, never-the-less. Being that these services are being videoed for YouTube, perhaps some xenos will be attracted to the beauty of Eastern Orthodox church services. Kali Saracosti.

    Reply
  • August 15, 2020 at 7:52 am
    Permalink

    AXIOS!!! May God guide and protect you always on this new chapter of service to all of us. Congratulations!

    Reply

Leave a Reply

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *